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Our Family Genealogy Pages

Joseph Charles Durand de St. Romes
Male 1786 - 1843

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Personal Information    |    Media    |    Notes    |    Sources    |    Event Map    |    All    |    PDF

  • Birth  13 Apr 1786  Port-au-Prince, Saint Domingue Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Baptized  15 Jul 1791  Port-au-Prince, Saint Domingue Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender  Male 
    Died  21 Aug 1843  New Orleans, Louisiana Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Buried  St. Louis Cemetery No. 2, New Orleans, Louisiana Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID  I2671  Stewart
    Last Modified  25 May 2011 
     
    Father  Charles Durand de St. Romes,   b. 20 Jun 1717, Marseille, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Sep 1793, Saint-Domingue, Port-au-Prince, Place du Marché Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother  Thérèse Jacques Chevalier,   b. c. 1725, Les Cayes, Saint Domingue (Haiti) Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Mar 1801, Port-au-Prince, Saint Domingue Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Relationship  birth 
    Married  01 Jul 1778 
    Family ID  F588  Group Sheet
     
    Family  Maria Thérèse Vion,   b. Circa 1801, Port-au-Prince, Saint Domingue Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Jan 1882, New Orleans, Louisiana Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  15 Jan 1823  New Orleans, Louisiana Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 4
    Notes 
    • Marriages
      6. An act to authorize a certain marriage. (Approved, March 23, 1822)
      Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the State of Louisiana, in general assembly convened,
      that Joseph Charles de St. Romes, a citizen of this state, and Maria Elizabeth Vion, his niece, be, and they are authorized to contract marriage, all laws contrary to the provisions of this act notwithstanding. [5]
    Children 
     1. Marie Elizabeth Amanda de St. Romes,   b. 27 Mar 1824, New Orleans, Louisiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 09 Jan 1826, New Orleans, Louisiana Find all individuals with events at this location
     2. Charles Jules de St. Romes,   b. 15 Nov 1828, New Orleans, Louisiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 03 Oct 1829, New Orleans, Louisiana Find all individuals with events at this location
     3. Henri Eugène de St. Romes,   b. circa 1829, New Orleans, Louisiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 07 May 1874, New Orleans, Louisiana Find all individuals with events at this location
     4. Charles Louis Ernest de St. Romes,   b. circa 1832, New Orleans, Louisiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Jun 1874, New Orleans, Louisiana Find all individuals with events at this location
     5. Charles Pierre Victor de St. Romes,   b. 06 Feb 1834, New Orleans, Louisiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Aug 1874, New Orleans, Louisiana Find all individuals with events at this location
     6. Marie Philomène Ernestine de St. Romes,   b. 07 Aug 1835, New Orleans, Louisiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 08 Jun 1840, New Orleans, Louisiana Find all individuals with events at this location
     7. Jean de St. Romes,   b. Abt 1836, New Orleans, Louisiana Find all individuals with events at this location
     8. Marie Elisabeth Madeleine de St. Romes,   b. 25 Nov 1840, New Orleans, Louisiana Find all individuals with events at this location
     9. Marie Ermance de St. Romes,   b. Abt 1841, New Orleans, Louisiana Find all individuals with events at this location
    Last Modified  03 Nov 2011 
    Family ID  F1477  Group Sheet
     
  • Event Map
    Event
    Link to Google MapsBirth - 13 Apr 1786 - Port-au-Prince, Saint Domingue Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBaptized - 15 Jul 1791 - Port-au-Prince, Saint Domingue Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 15 Jan 1823 - New Orleans, Louisiana Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 21 Aug 1843 - New Orleans, Louisiana Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - St. Louis Cemetery No. 2, New Orleans, Louisiana Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Maps 
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend = Address   = Location   = City/Town   = County/Shire   = State/Province   = Country   = Not Set

  • Headstones
    de St. Romes tomb
    de St. Romes tomb
    de St. Romes Tomb
    de St. Romes Tomb
    Ici Repose
    J. C. de St. Romes
    Né Au Port Au Prince
    Isle St. Domingue
    décédé le 21 Aout 1848
    Age de 52 Ans
    -----
    -----
    Ici Repose
    Marie Therese Vion
    Epouse de
    J.C. de St. Romes
    décédée le 22 Janvier 1882
    -----
    Oui ma mère cherie repose en paix dans le eeime du seigneur
    -----
    de St. Romes Tomb
    de St. Romes Tomb
     
  • Notes 
    • ST. ROMES, Joseph Charles, journalist. Born, Port-au-Prince, Saint-Domingue, 1790 or 1791. Removed to New Orleans before 1815; fought in Battalion of Orleans during Battle of New Orleans, 1815; edited and published Courrier de la Louisiane, 1815-1843; published Donaldsonville Creole (probably published in New Orleans), 1816. Served as state printer, 1817-1823, 1839, 1842; also served as printer of the city of New Orleans. Married Marie Therese Vion (d. 1882), his niece, 1822. Died, New Orleans, August 21, 1843. F.M.J. Sources; Samuel Joseph Marino, "The French-Refugee Newspapers and Periodicals in the United States, 1789-1825" (Ph. D. dissertation, University of Michigan, 1962); Ronald R. Morazan, Biographical Sketches of the Veterans of the Battalion of Orleans, 1814-1815 (1979); obituary, New Orleans Commercial Bulletin, August 22, 1843.

      Taken from http://lahistory.org/site36.php


    • From Proceedings of the American Antiquarian Society published in 1914

      [New Orleans] Courrier de la Louisiane, 1807-1820+.
      Tri-weekly. Established Oct. 14, 1807. The first few issues had no publisher's imprint, but within a few weeks, certainly by March, 1808, the publishers were given as Thierry & Co. The paper was printed in both French and English, the first two pages in French and the last two, with a column heading "Louisiana Courier," in English. In 1809, or early in 1810, the name of the publishers was changed to Thierry & Dacqueny ( __ Thierry and Jean Dacqueny), but between June 11 and July 4, 1810, Thierry resumed sole proprietorship. In 1815, Thierry transferred the paper to J. C. de St. Romes, who continued it until after 1820. Throughout most of this period, a weekly issue "for the country" was also published. Issues from Sept. 21, 1810, to Feb. 20, 1811, were titled "Courrier de la Louisiane pour la Campagne," and issues from Nov. 27, 1811 to after 1820 were without title except column headings.

      Harvard has Oct. 23-30, 1807; May 9-Sept. 2, Dec. 12-23, 1808, scattering; also Sept. 21, Oct. 15, 23, 1810, Nov. 27-Dec. 18, 1811; Feb. 19, Apr. 29, July 8, 29, Sept. 16, 30, Oct. 7, 1812, of the country issues.

      New Orleans City Archives has July 4-Dec. 5, 1810; July 29-Nov. 29, 1811; Jan. 6-Dec. 31, 1813; Nov. 18, 21, 25, 1814; Jan. 3, 1816-Dec. 27, 1820+.

      La. State Museum has Apr. 27, 1814; May 21, 1817.

      Lib. Cong, has Sept. 19, 1814, of the triweekly issue, and Feb. 20, 1811, Jan. 1819 - Dec. 1820, of the country issues.

      Mass. Hist. Soc. has Apr. 3, 1820.

      Wis. Hist. Soc. has Apr. 29, 1808.

      A. A. S. has:
      1808. (Tri-weekly) Mar. 9, 14. Apr. 6, 18, 20, 22.
      May 9, 13. June 3. July 13, 15. Aug. 3, 8, 12. 1810. (Tri-weekly) June 11.
      1810. (Weekly) Nov. 14. 1818. (Weekly) Apr. 6, 13, 20. Supplement: no. 1650. [6]
    • From the city battalion of uniform companies to major-general Jackson.

      New Orleans, March 16, 1815

      GENERAL-We have delayed until this moment the expression of our feelings towards you, lest the honest emotions of our hearts should be ascribed to a desire of propitiating the favor of our commander. At this moment when neither hope nor fear can be supposed to have influenced us, we pray you to receive the sincere tribute of our thanks — as soldiers for the confidence you have reposed in us, for the paternal cure with which you have watched over our comforts, and above all, for that justice you have done to our zeal in assigning us on every occasion a post of danger and of honor—as citizens, for the wisdom of the measures you have devised to protect our country; for the skill and bravery with which they were executed; and for that indispensible energy to which we owe our safety. Leaving to others the task of declaiming about privileges and constitutional rights, we are content in having fought in support of them--we have understanding enuogh to know when they are wantonly violated; and no false reasoning shall make us ungrateful to the man whose wisdom and valor has secured them to us and our posterity! We do not deal in professions, but we pray you, general, to be assured, that in the officers and men of this battalion you have soldiers who have been and are always ready to affront every danger under your command; fellow citizens, grateful for your services; friends, personally attached to your fortunes, and ready to promote your happiness at the risk of their own. You have allowed us the endearing title of your brothers in arms--it was given to us on this field, strewed then with the bodies of our enemies; and we feel a noble pride in the conciousness that allows us to accept it. That fraternity cemented in hostile blood shall be the pride of our lives; and in after times will secure to our children the respect of posterity. General, common phrases cannot express the emotions which agitate us at this moment of our separation--but we pray heaven to watch over your safety ; and we trust to a grateful country for the honors and advancement which your services have merited.
      Camp Jackson, March 16.
      J. B. PLAUCHE, major.
      STE. GEME, captain.
      M. WHITE, captain.
      A. GUIBERT, captain.
      HUDRY, captain.
      P. ROCHE, captain.
      JOHN ST. JEAN, lieutenant.
      COEUR DE ROY,
      DE ST. ROMES, lieutenant.
      N. THOMPSON, lieutenant.
      C. FREMONT, lieutenant.
      DUHULQUOD, lieutenant.
      L. PILIÉ, lieutenant.
      BENETAUD,
      BERTEL, lieutenant.
      HUET, lieutenant.
      LE MOUNIER, sur. major.
      THE GENERAL'S ANSWER.
      Fellow Soldiers--Popular favor has always been with me a secondary object. My first wish, in political life, has been to be useful to my country. Yet I am not insensible to the good opinion of my fellow citizens ; I would do much to obtain it ; but, I cannot, for this purpose, sacrifice my own conscience, or what I conceive to be the interests of my country. These principles have prepared me to receive, with just satisfaction, the address you have presented. The first wish of my heart, the safety our country, has been accomplished, and it affords me the greatest happiness to know that the means taken to secure this object have met the approbation of those who have had the best opportunities of judging of their propriety, and who, from their various relations, might be supposed the most ready to censure any which had been improperly resorted to. The distinction you draw, gentlemen, between those who only declaim about civil rights and those who fight to maintain them, shews how just and practical a knowledge you have of the true principles of liberty--without such knowledge all theory is useless or mischievous. Whenever the invaluable rights which we enjoy under our own happy constitution are threatened by invasion, privileges the most dear, and which, in ordinary times, ought to be regarded as the most sacred, may be required to be infringed for their security. At such a crisis, we have only to determine whether we will suspend, for a time, the exercise of the latter, that we may secure the permanent enjoyment of the former. Is it wise, in such a moment, to sacrifice the spirit of the laws to the letter, and by adhering too strictly to the letter, lose the substance forever, in order taht we may, for an instant, preserve the shadow? It is not to be imagined that th eexpress provisions of any written law can fully embrace emergencies which suppose and occasion the suspension of all law, but the highest and the last, that of self preservation. No right is more precious to a freeman than that of suffrage, but had your election taken place on the 8th of January, would your declaimers have advised you to abandon the defence of your country in order to exercise this inestimable privilege of the polls? Is it to be supposed that your general, if he regarded the important trust committed to his charge, would have permitted you to preserve the constitution by an act which would have involved constitution, country and honor, in one undistinguished ruin?

      What is more justly important than personal liberty ; yet how can the civil enjoyment of this privilege be made to consist with the order, subordination and discipline of a camp? Let the sentinel be removed by subpoena from his post, let writs of habeas corpus carry away the officers from the lines, and the enemy may conquer your country, by only employing lawyers to defend your constitution.

      Private property is held sacred in all good governments and particularly in our own, yet, shall the fear of invading it prevent a general from marching his army over a cornfield, or burning a house which protects the enemy?

      These and a thousand other intances might be cited to shew that laws must sometimes be silent when necessity speaks. The only question with the friend of his country will be, have these laws been made to be silent wantonly and unnecessarily? If necessity dictated the measure, if a resort to it was important for the preservation of those rights which we esteem so dear, and in defence of which we had so willingly taken up arms, surely it would not have been unbecoming in the commander in chief to have shrunk from the responsibility which it involved. He did nit shrink from it. In declaring martial law, his object and his only object, was to embody the whole resources of the country for its defence. That law, while it existed, necessarily suspended all rights and privileges inconsistent with its provisions. It is matter of surprise, that they who beast themselves the champions of those rights and privileges, should not, when they were first put in danger by the proclamation of martial law, have manifested that lively sensibility of which they have since made so ostentatious a display. So far, however, was this from being the case, that this measure not only met, then, the open support of those who when their country was invaded thought resistance a virtue, and the silent approbation of all—but even received the particular recommendation and encouragement of many who now inveigh the most bitterly against it. It was not until a victory, secured by that very measure, had lessened the danger which occasioned a resort to it, that the present feeling guardians of our rights discovered that the commanding general ought to have suffered his posts to be abandoned through the interference of a foreign agent—his ranks to be thinned by desertion, and his whole army to be broken to pieces by mutiny ; while yet a powerful force of the enemy remained on your coast and within a few hours sail of your city.

      I thought and acted differently. It was net until I discovered that the civil power stood no longer in need of the military for its support, that I restored to it its usual functions ; and the restoration was not delayed a moment after that period had arrived.

      Under these circumstances, fellow soldiers, your resolution to let others declaim about privileges and constitutional rights, will never draw upon you the charge of being indifferent to those inestimable blessings—your attachment to them has been proved by a stronger title—that of having nobly fought to preserve them. You who have thus supported them against the open pretensions of a powerful enemy will never I trust, surrender them to the underhand machinations of men who stand aloof in the hour of peril, and who, when the danger is gone, claim to be the "defenders of your constitution."

      An honorable peace has dissolved our military connection; and, in a few days, I shall quit a country endeared to me by the most pleading recollections. Among the most prominent of these, gentlemen, are those I shall ever entertain of the distinguished, bravery, the exact discipline, the ardent zeal and the important services of your corps. The offered friendship of each individual composing it, I receive with pleasure and sincerely reciprocate. I shall always pride myself on a fraternity with such men, created in such a cause.

      ANDREW JACKSON
      Maj. gen. com'dg 7th military dist. [7]

    Baptized:
    • Acte de baptême de Joseph Charles De Saint ROMES. Le 15 juillet 1791 Port au Prince. (Naissance du 13 avril 1786 au Port au Prince)

      L'an mil sept cent quatre vingt onze, le quinze juillet a été baptisé Joseph Charles né le treize avril mil sept cent quatre vingt six, fils en légitime mariage de Messire Charles DURAND De Saint ROMES, chevalier de l'ordre Royal et militaire de Saint Louis, ancien ingénieur en chef de Saint Domingues, colonel d'infanterie et habitant au morne de l'hôpital et de Dame Thérèse Jacques CHEVALIER son épouse, le parrain a été le sieur Joseph QUERQUY, cy devant sous-lieutenant d'artillerie ngt au port au prince, la marraine demoiselle Marie Anne de Saint ROMES s?ur de l'enfant, tous de cette paroisse, en foi de quoi avons signé avec le parrain la marraine le père et la mère de l'enfant. Signé : Marieane de St ROMES. QUERQUY. Chevalier ST ROMES. DURAN ST ROMES. FG LE CUN Vicaire.

      Source: Noel Haentjens

    Buried:
    • Square 1

    Died:
    • Be it remembered that on this day, to wit: the twenty third of August in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty three and the sixty eighth of Independence of the United States of America, before me, Alfred E. Forstall duly commissioned and sworn Recorder of Births and Deaths in and for the City and Parish of Orleans, personally appeared Mr. Peter Deverges, Jr., a native of this Parish of Orleans, thirty eight years of age a Black and residing on Rampart Street, between St. Ann & du Maine streets in the first municipality of this city of New Orleans, who by these presents doth declare that Mr. Joseph Charles de St. Romes a native of St. Dominique, about fifty two years of age and formerly the editor of Louisiana Courier in this city of New Orleans departed this life on Monday last the twenty first of this present month of August at two o'clock pm at his residence No. 80 on Chartres Street, between Conti and Bienville Streets in the first municipality of this city. The said late Mr. Joseph Charles de St. Romes was lawfully married to Miss Vion, his surviving widow, residing in this city.
    • Giquel
      Ne varietur New Orleans 8th October 1847

      Nouvelle Orleans ce 8 Decembre 1835
      Au nom du Perre, et Du fils et du St. Esprit armssi sect-il
      Ceci est mon Testament
      Je declare par cette présente que c'ets ma dernière volonté et ne vaulaut pas faire du tort a personne je fais M. Josephe Charles Durand de St. Romes mon fondé de Peuvoir, et faire ce qu'il coina le Mellieur pour Sinherit de ma famille.

      Je declare par cette presuite qui les cent quarante six Terrain que j'ais achété confoinhament avec Monsieur M. Fauché Cougat est pour nous deux, et qui lin leverra par mis lirre et les vingts Terrains que nous
      meal des Proprietés Dousson est a nous deux dont les trois terrains que j'ai achete de susceession de le page sont compris et que Mr Louis Couvertier est eu pas seur.
      Je declare qui Monsieur Fauché Couzat a payé environ dix Milles Piastres ? sa comp le particulié, je prie Mr. St. Romes de ne pas faire du cune objection du compte que Mr. Fauché Couzat Pourra le lui prosanté Nous avons haufaund ag'it comme de bon ami, et comme de bon frere.
      Il est convenu autre mai est Monsieur Fauche Gouzat que largeaut que jaurais arancé pour la escrité qu'il par ferait les comptes au est de la Bauque comme je les est payé.

      Je declare que ? les Billiets endossé par Mr. Fauché Couzat sont pour le compte de la societé aussi que le Billiet que Mr. Louis Counerbée a audossé.
      je déclare que j'ai deux Billiet eudossé par Mr. De St. Romes, un de douze cents piastres l'autre de huit cents piastres les deux buillets son pour mon usages a la Bauque de le tat de la Louisiane.

      Je déclare avon un Billiet entre les maime de Mademoselle Tebinitte Giquel, de la somme de Six neufs piastre
      dont lelui est payé les compte a Raison de huit pour cent.
      Je déclare que mademoiselle Tebinitte Giquel ma donné deux cents Soixante Cinq Piastres pour elle et pour les depasé eu bauque, le tout formaut une somme dix huit cents sauxante cinq piastres pour lui achete une maison queue.
      Je trouverais socasion.

      Je déclare que Mr. Jean Baptiste Tomas Giquel a sans mes anhit en sa possession epte reshant des Bijouts que j'avais comté a son frère, et qu'il dont tenir compte a ma famille vu qu il cest comparté comme un fils ingrat envers moi.

      Je déclare laissé à Mademoiselle Ermantine Giquel ainssi qua Clemantine Giquel mes deux dernierre fille comme n'ayaut pas fini leur education et quel son trops Jeune encorre la somme de Mille Piastre, dont leur merre eu Sera Chargé.

      Je désire etre enterré selon la Religion Catholique apostoli que et Romaine Comme Chevalier Semptier.

      Je prie Monsier de St. Romes de Bamplin Mes dernierre valmhés et que appris ma mont que personne ne puisse faire des Reproches a ma famille je déclare que les negros Bosheo, Bily, Tom Lime, Francis, Jaque et Coffie on ete acheté pour le compte de la societte et payé par moi et que Coffie ils resheral payé deux cent cinquante piastres a payé sur le dit Coffie, et que a _______ été payé par Mr. Mas Fauché Couzat dont il doit l'avoir parté sur son compte particulié

      De plus nous avon achete huit esclave quatre autre les chains de duralde et quatre entre les mains de daquin qui sont ______ Macarty Michop, Masiee Flza le tout pour le compte de la Societé.

      Nous avons pendie deux negro que sont Robin et ? qui ont été payé par Moi comme lon le verra par ? ?

      Je prie Mr. de St. Romes darrin son de la ? Elizabethe Durand de St. Romes damir soin de la tous soubenin dans ? ? ? ?
      de St. Romes Davion es and a ma paurre Clarisse cets celle qui ma boufound Brouné le plus damitié, cets pour elle je reqrette la vie.

      Quand je me suis Marie avec Mademoiselle Elizabeth Durand de St. Romes, Javais à ma possession seize cents piastres, par conséquant il revion a mes deux filles du premier lit huit cents piastres que doit étre prelené le premier le reste a par haqer entre mes huit neuf ans et ma femmes.

      Adieu mon cherre St. Romes remplissez mes Dermierres volonte.

      Signé Giquel





      Be it remembered that on this eighth day of October in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty seven and the 72nd of the Independence of the United States of America.

      Upon the application of Mrs. François Daubert and pursuant to my decrees bearing date 14 September & of the October 1847.

      Before me E. A. Camon Judge of the Second District Court of New Orleans formally came and appeared M. M. Frederick Buisson & Jean Baptiste Faget witnesses, who being duly sworn, were by me presented with an unsealed packet and bearing the following superscription to wit: "Ceci est mon testament, il ne sourera qu'a ma mort" did declare and say that the said superscription is in the proper handwriting of the late Jean Baptiste François Giquel, deceased.

      Whereupon the said packet being by me broken open was found to contain an instrument of writing, written on three sides of a sheet of looseafe paper beginning with the following words "Nouvelle Orleans ce 8 Decembre 1835" and ending with the following words "Adieu mon cherre St. Romes Remphissez mes dermerres volonte Giquel" and purporting to be his olographic last will and testament which ? by me exhibited to the aforesaid witness was by them recognised and declared to be entirely written dated and signed by the testahar the said Jean Baptiste François Giquel deceased which they attest as having often seen him write and sign during his lifetime and the said appearers did here unto set their hands after due reading thereof, on the day, month, and year first above written.

      Signed
      Fred Buisson
      Jean Baptiste Faget

      Sworn to and subscribed before me
      this eighth day of October 1847
      Signed E. A. Canon, Judge

      Whereupon I the said Judge do hereby declare the said olographic last will and testament to be duly honored and after having read the said will in a loud and distinct voice to teh aforesaid witnesses and in the presence of Messrs A D Guesmont & M Bertin all present in court, and after having signed the said will Ne Varietur at the beginning and end of each page do now order the same to be deposited and recorded in the office of the client of the second district court of New Orleans and that the execution thereof take place according to law.

      Done in the Second District Court of New Orleans this eighth day of October 1847.
      Signed
      A H Guesmon
      J M Bertin
      Signed E. A. Canon, Judge


     
  • Sources 
    1. [S77] Baptismal Certificate (Reliability: 3).

    2. [S58] Orleans Parish Death Index (Reliability: 3).
      Vol. 9, page 511 1/2
      Age 52

    3. [S16] Archdiocese of New Orleans Sacramental Records Volume 15 (1822-1823), Earl C. Woods, (New Orleans, La. : Archdiocese of New Orleans, 1987), F379 .N553 W66 1987 REF V.15., 116 (Reliability: 3).
      DE ST. ROMES
      Joseph Carlos (Carlos Durand and Jacques Theresa CHEVALIER), native of Port-au-Prince on the island of Santo Domingo, resident of this city
      married Maria Theresa VION, Jan. 15, 1823
      Witnesses: Luis Maria REYNAUD, Bartolome GRIMA, Luis Joseph PILIE, and Juan Francisco GIGUEL.
      (SLC, M7, 27)

    4. [S16] Archdiocese of New Orleans Sacramental Records Volume 15 (1822-1823), Earl C. Woods, (New Orleans, La. : Archdiocese of New Orleans, 1987), F379 .N553 W66 1987 REF V.15., 388 (Reliability: 3).
      VION
      Maria Theresa (Miguel and Maria Ysavel DE ST. ROMES), native of Port-au-Prince [Santo Domingo], resident of this city,
      married Joseph Carlos DE ST. ROMES, Jan. 15, 1823
      (SLC, M7, 27)

    5. [S128] A General Digest of the Acts of the Legislature of Louisiana, Volume 2 1804-1827, L. Moreau Lislet, esq., (Benjamin Levy, 1828), 14 (Reliability: 3).

    6. [S107] Proceedings of the American Antiquarian Society, New Series, Vol. 24, American Antiquarian Society, (American Antiquarian Society, 1914), 405.

    7. [S109] Niles Weekly Register, March-September, 1815, vol. 8, 142-143 (Reliability: 3).

  

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